Adult Students With an Education Gap – No Written Language

Vanuatu’s tropical islands are renowned for their diversity, with nearly 115 distinct cultures and languages. The International Year of Languages has been declared for 2008. Now a group, from the 83 islands of Vanuatu, have met to convert their oral language to the written word.

Port Vila hosted 23 adult students from 12 different language groups, all keen to discover the power of writing in their own language. Slowly, language barriers were broken down, as these shy people began to communicate with each other.

Many Ni-Vanuatu people are multi-lingual, speaking French, Bislama, English and their home language. For 30 years or more the adults have used an oral language, with primary schooling providing no writing experiences in their own language.

Cultural ceremonies and stories discussed under the banyan tree and over the cooking pots, have seen customs and tales of ancestors passed from generation to generation.

From as far as the remote, northern islands of Motolava and the southern Tanna, these adult students have arrived in the capital. Jesse, a mother of three children, explained in broken English, “For most of us it is the first time we have left our island homes, flown in a plane, or crossed the ocean”.

An extract of literature was translated into their language. Faces glowed with pride at seeing their language written for the first time. “Communication was at the heart of the workshop,” explained a spokesperson for the project.

“The translation of important information to the Mother tongue has highlighted this. When the students return to their island homes, they will share their knowledge and show their community the power of the written word. The community will move forward in leaps and bounds in this exciting new adventure.”

Free education is not available in Vanuatu. Everyone must pay school fees as the government provides limited resources. For most families the fee is beyond the small incomes of villagers, living in a ‘no-cash-economy’.

The horrific consequence is:

o Only 55.8% of Vanuatu kids will get to grade 6;
o Of those only 18.2% will go to high school;
o 26% will never go to school.

Many parents are not able to read or write in any language.

Vanuatu desperately needs help to educate the next generation. Although rich in knowledge about their land, culture and traditions, the Happiest Country on Earth (voted in 2006) needs help to educate the young generation, if the country is to move forward. As a Lesser Developed country, donor funding is seen pouring into the country, but education is low on the priority list.

YouMe Support Foundation, a Child Trust Fund, is dedicated to giving these children a high school education grants for the children of the outer islands of Vanuatu. You can help, donate and make a difference in the lives of these people and you might win the boutique resort. Visit our Website for your Blue Moon Opportunity.

Read These Simple Tips to Learn How to Own a Boutique

A lot of business-minded individuals who also happen to have an eye for fashion want to know how to own a boutique. Running a clothing store can be a fulfilling and profitable experience. Becoming a clothing boutique owner can be fun, especially if your store is brimming with fashionable items that are popular among your target customers. As the owner, you will be able to show off your sense of style through your store’s display.

It would be to your advantage if you do your homework first and learn how to start a boutique and run it properly. Choosing a suitable name for your boutique would be a good starting point. It should represent what your store is selling. Make it catchy so your customers will not forget it so easily. Next, you need to acquire a business license and other legal documents so you can begin to operate. Make sure that you have completed the requirements ahead of time so it is not going to cause any delay in your opening. Map out a budget plan during the planning process. Allocate sufficient amount to your start-up capital and make sure that you have enough financial resources to draw your funds from. This will keep you from running out of budget, which would clearly impede your goal of opening a business.

Getting educated on how to own a boutique will give you insights on how to manage your store properly. For instance, you need to know where to set up your store so that you can attract a large number of customers. Location is the key to a successful and lucrative business. Select a site where there’s a huge concentration of your target market. A mall is also an ideal place to put your store since people go to malls to shop. If you are only renting a space, you should pay attention to the exact date when your contract expires.

It is important to define your target market so you can provide what they are looking for. Observe carefully and learn how to own a boutique. Be specific when it comes to the items that you want to fill your store with. Choosing to sell a specific product exclusively makes your task of creating a base of repeat customers easier because you are catering to a specific need. You can specialize in selling sports wear, children’s apparel, or teenage accessories. The list of products you can sell is endless. You need to contact suppliers to provide you with the items you plan on selling. Get in touch with several suppliers and choose the one that could give you the best deal. You can also opt to do business with more than one supplier if it means saving up on your expenses.

Worth Every Penny Book Review

As a business owner of a home-based photography studio, I find that constant education is vital to the continued growth of my business. There are a variety of forms of education for photographers and other business owners: conferences, classes, local meetings, or books being a few. Books are often one of the cheaper forms of education and I find a lot of great insights from books like Worth Every Penny.

Worth Every Penny is a business book written by both Sarah Petty and Erin Verbeck founder and chief of The Joy of Marketing. This book is targeted toward small business owners running boutique style businesses. While bigger businesses are focused on volume, boutique businesses are focused on experience and high-end, quality products. This book helps boutique business owners understand some of the keys necessary to running their boutique business.

Worth Every Penny gives great advice on how to build a strong brand to market to your ideal client base, which is crucial in a boutique business. It’s importance to convey luxury and a high-end experience to your current and feature client base. The book also discusses strategies for creating a strong marketing and advertising campaign to reflect this idea and what makes your business unique. It is always important to convey what makes your business different and more desirable than your competition.

A huge part of boutique businesses is building relationships. When you aren’t working with a high volume business, you have the time to invest in getting to know your clients. Worth Every Penny discusses ways to convey your appreciation to your customers and develop strong relationships with them, which can help grow your business.

And of course, with the extra time, value, and care dedicated to the customers of a boutique business, a higher price is often a necessity. Worth Every Penny discusses methods for pricing your products and adding additional value to your clients orders. After all, to be a viable business, you need to make a profit.

I personally found Sarah Petty & Erin Verbeck’s book, Worth Every Penny, to be incredibly beneficial and insightful in working on my own business. Determining my strengths and unique products, how to market them and provide my clients with the best care possible are incredibly important to me, and this book has helped me narrow down and hone these things. I would highly recommend this book to any boutique business – not just photography business owners!